The Infinite Baseball Card Set is a never-ending card set of baseball’s forgotten heroes: Negro League legends, barnstorming mercenaries, semi-pro sluggers, blacklisted bums, foreign phenoms, bush league oddballs, and the famous before they were famous.

New Book! 21: The Illustrated Journal of Outsider Baseball

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I wanted to come out with a book that could show all of what I try to do with my work: combine illustration with entertaining storytelling and good research. Here’s a sneak peak at what some of the spreads look like. […]

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Minnie Miñoso: Cuba to Cooperstown via the Negro Leagues

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When the teenage Orestes Miñoso approached the manager of the Ambrosia Candy Company baseball team for a tryout, little did he know that it would be the beginning of a career that would span four countries and last seven decades. […]

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Eiji Sawamura: Japan’s Number One

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On this day back in 1934, 17 year-old schoolboy Eiji Sawamura struck out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx and Charlie Gehringer in succession, instantly becoming a national hero and forever known as “Japan’s Number One.” […]

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Memo Luna: The Story Behind Card 222

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One can almost hear the voices of 10 year-old boys repeating the name “MEMO LUNA!” as they expectantly thumbed through a freshly opened pack of the new 1954 Bowman bubble gum cards. While coming across a Ray Katt, Gil Coan or Mel Hoderlein would have merited merely a grunt or groan, even the most jaded 10 year-old boy had to admit that “Memo Luna” had an alluring ring to it. […]

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Eddie Kazak: Bayoneted, buried and blown up, but not broken

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Baseball’s great for providing examples of how to overcome adversity and succeed – some are well-known like Jackie Robinson and Pete Gray – but I’ve always drawn my inspiration from a now-forgotten ballplayer named Eddie Kazak. […]

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Jack Riley: The last season of the Shanghai City League

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Just as he had every summer since 1931, Lucky Jack Riley made sure his Wednesdays and Sundays were cleared for playing baseball. However, world events would make 1940 the last season for both the Shanghai City League and Lucky Jack’s baseball career… […]

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Roy Counts: Crime, Punishment & Outsider Baseball

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The term “outlaw league” described a league that wasn’t recognized by Organized Baseball, the entity that controlled the major and minor leagues. But for Roy Counts, “outlaw league” had a slightly different meaning… […]

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Ralph Branca: Because he was strong enough.

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No other moment in sports history comes close to that single game in October, 1951. Countless non-fiction books have been written about the ’51 pennant race, the game, what happened to the home run ball, and the players after the cheering died down. Thomson’s home run has been employed as a plot device for shelves of fiction novels and TV shows, and hardly an autobiography of a person alive in 1951 could escape mentioning where they were on that day. […]

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Coming Soon: A New Book!

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I wanted to come out with a book that could show all of what I try to do with my work: combine illustration with entertaining storytelling and good research. Here’s a sneak peak at what some of the spreads look like. […]

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Mickey Mantle: Got Those Kansas City Blues

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Along with the weight of being Joe DiMaggio’s successor, Mickey Mantle also had to endure being labeled a draft dodger, steering clear of shyster businessmen, avoiding exploding fireworks, and most of all, keeping from being sent back to the minors. […]

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