The Infinite Baseball Card Set is a never-ending card set of baseball’s forgotten heroes: Negro League legends, barnstorming mercenaries, semi-pro sluggers, blacklisted bums, foreign phenoms, bush league oddballs, and the famous before they were famous.

Pee Wee Reese: A Shortstop Grows in Louisville

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In 1938, a teenage shortstop straight out of a city church league emerged as the best shortstop in the minors, a prospect so highly regarded that the Boston Red Sox bought the entire Louisville Colonels franchise just so they could have him. […]

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Interview on SABRcast with Rob Neyer

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Recently, I was interviewed by the great Rob Neyer for his podcast “SABRcast.” During the show we talk about everything from how I create my art and favorite baseball team to color blindness and antique tube radios! […]

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Frank “Dins” Makosky: The Johnny Appleseed of the Forkball

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Yankees manager Joe McCarthy knew the only way to win the 1936 World Series was by neutralizing Carl Hubbell’s screwball. None of his players had faced a screwballer all year, and that was a problem. Fortunately, McCarthy had the answer… […]

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Doc Sykes: Spitballs, Civil Rights, and Dentistry

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Doc Sykes was one of the more interesting men to have played in the Negro Leagues. A star college athlete, Sykes was the ace of the Baltimore Black Sox when not practicing dentistry, and went on to become a Civil Rights hero. […]

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New Book! 21: The Illustrated Journal of Outsider Baseball

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I wanted to come out with a book that could show all of what I try to do with my work: combine illustration with entertaining storytelling and good research. Here’s a sneak peak at what some of the spreads look like. […]

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Minnie Miñoso: Cuba to Cooperstown via the Negro Leagues

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When the teenage Orestes Miñoso approached the manager of the Ambrosia Candy Company baseball team for a tryout, little did he know that it would be the beginning of a career that would span four countries and last seven decades. […]

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Eiji Sawamura: Japan’s Number One

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On this day back in 1934, 17 year-old schoolboy Eiji Sawamura struck out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx and Charlie Gehringer in succession, instantly becoming a national hero and forever known as “Japan’s Number One.” […]

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Memo Luna: The Story Behind Card 222

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One can almost hear the voices of 10 year-old boys repeating the name “MEMO LUNA!” as they expectantly thumbed through a freshly opened pack of the new 1954 Bowman bubble gum cards. While coming across a Ray Katt, Gil Coan or Mel Hoderlein would have merited merely a grunt or groan, even the most jaded 10 year-old boy had to admit that “Memo Luna” had an alluring ring to it. […]

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Eddie Kazak: Bayoneted, buried and blown up, but not broken

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Baseball’s great for providing examples of how to overcome adversity and succeed – some are well-known like Jackie Robinson and Pete Gray – but I’ve always drawn my inspiration from a now-forgotten ballplayer named Eddie Kazak. […]

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Jack Riley: The last season of the Shanghai City League

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Just as he had every summer since 1931, Lucky Jack Riley made sure his Wednesdays and Sundays were cleared for playing baseball. However, world events would make 1940 the last season for both the Shanghai City League and Lucky Jack’s baseball career… […]

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