The Infinite Baseball Card Set is a never-ending card set of baseball’s forgotten heroes: Negro League legends, barnstorming mercenaries, semi-pro sluggers, blacklisted bums, foreign phenoms, bush league oddballs, and the famous before they were famous.

Jim Bunning: A Perfect Father’s Day

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What’s a better way to celebrate Father’s Day than throwing a no-hit COMPLETE GAME? Phillies ace Jim Bunning did just that back in 1964… […]

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Mickey Stubblefield: Lil’ Satchel Integrates the Kitty League

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When Jackie Robinson integrated the International League in 1946, there were 52 minor leagues operating in North America. It was up to 51 other strong individuals to be the first in the other 51 leagues. Mickey Stubblefield was one of them. […]

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“Rosey” Rosenstein: Memorial Day, 2022

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Among the 200,000 U.S. Army soldiers that stormed ashore on the Philippine island of Leyte in November of 1944 was a 24 year-old staff sergeant named Milt Rosenstein. Just three years earlier he had a spectacular first season in professional ball, winning 20 games, led his league in strikeouts and pitched the Miami Beach Flamingos to the Florida East Coast League Championship. […]

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Pee Wee Reese: A Shortstop Grows in Louisville

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In 1938, a teenage shortstop straight out of a city church league emerged as the best shortstop in the minors, a prospect so highly regarded that the Boston Red Sox bought the entire Louisville Colonels franchise just so they could have him. […]

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Interview on SABRcast with Rob Neyer

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Recently, I was interviewed by the great Rob Neyer for his podcast “SABRcast.” During the show we talk about everything from how I create my art and favorite baseball team to color blindness and antique tube radios! […]

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Frank “Dins” Makosky: The Johnny Appleseed of the Forkball

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Yankees manager Joe McCarthy knew the only way to win the 1936 World Series was by neutralizing Carl Hubbell’s screwball. None of his players had faced a screwballer all year, and that was a problem. Fortunately, McCarthy had the answer… […]

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Doc Sykes: Spitballs, Civil Rights, and Dentistry

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Doc Sykes was one of the more interesting men to have played in the Negro Leagues. A star college athlete, Sykes was the ace of the Baltimore Black Sox when not practicing dentistry, and went on to become a Civil Rights hero. […]

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New Book! 21: The Illustrated Journal of Outsider Baseball

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I wanted to come out with a book that could show all of what I try to do with my work: combine illustration with entertaining storytelling and good research. Here’s a sneak peak at what some of the spreads look like. […]

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Minnie Miñoso: Cuba to Cooperstown via the Negro Leagues

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When the teenage Orestes Miñoso approached the manager of the Ambrosia Candy Company baseball team for a tryout, little did he know that it would be the beginning of a career that would span four countries and last seven decades. […]

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Eiji Sawamura: Japan’s Number One

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On this day back in 1934, 17 year-old schoolboy Eiji Sawamura struck out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx and Charlie Gehringer in succession, instantly becoming a national hero and forever known as “Japan’s Number One.” […]

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