The Infinite Baseball Card Set is a never-ending card set of baseball’s forgotten heroes: Negro League legends, barnstorming mercenaries, semi-pro sluggers, blacklisted bums, foreign phenoms, bush league oddballs, and the famous before they were famous.

New Color Prints Available!

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Among the things I re-discovered when culling my archive was the color proofs sent to me when I when I was writing my book, The League of Outsider Baseball. Here’s the second group of 10 different illustrations that are available in my store. […]

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John Beckwith: Too big to forget

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At one time, John Beckwith was the man all subsequent Blackball sluggers were measured against. Yet today, he rarely rates more than a passing mention – and that is a shame because John Beckwith is simply too big to forget. […]

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“Dutch” Raffeis: The Navy’s Own Flying Dutchman

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Military baseball historian Shawn Hennessy tells us the story of Dutch Raffeis. Dutch played against Babe Ruth, was sought after by the Chicago Cubs, won 19 championships in 20 years, and was probably the greatest Navy baseball player of all-time. […]

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“Happy” Evans: Indispensable Spare Part

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When it came to the 1931 Grays, one of the greatest ballclubs ever assembled in the history of the game, who did their owner/manager Cum Posey choose to send in when one of his all-stars or Hall of Famers was injured? Bill “Happy” Evans, that’s who! […]

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On the Drawing Table: Ebbets Field Scoreboard

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While working on an illustration of Gil Hodges, I became fascinated with the iconic Ebbets Field scoreboard. Wandering off on a tangent, I did a series of illustrations documenting the evolution of the famous scoreboard. […]

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On the Drawing Table: The Pee Wee Reese Report

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Here’s a look into what I’ve been up to lately – designing a newsletter for the Pee Wee Reese Chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research. […]

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Babe Ruth: Becoming the Babe

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There was no more famous Baltimore Oriole than Babe Ruth. The 19 year-old got his start with Jack Dunn’s Birds, and between Dunn and catcher Ben Egan, Ruth quickly developed into the hottest pitcher in the minor leagues. However, competition from the Federal League led Jack Dunn to sell his greatest find, causing a lifetime of resentment and the reason why he would hold on to so many of his stars long past the time they should have gone to the major leagues. […]

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Ted Kluszewski: Film holds the “Klu”

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In 1951, Ted Kluszewski was mired in a batting slump that threatened his once promising career. Then one evening his wife, Eleanor, had a solution that would save both her husband’s and countless other ballplayers’ careers. […]

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Gil Hodges: Keep the commandments, and pray for Gil Hodges

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After recovering from one of the worst batting slumps in baseball history, Gil Hodges finished up his comeback 1953 season in a unique fashion: joining a mostly Black team for a 36-game tour deep into the Jim Crow south. […]

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Irish Jack LeRoy” Jake becomes Jake who becomes Jake again

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In late 1927, New York Giants manager John McGraw shelled out $10,000 to buy minor league pitcher “Irish Jack” LeRoy. However, the 22-game winner was not Irish, nor was his name Jack LeRoy… […]

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